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DxO Viewpoint 3 review

By December 9, 2016 One Comment

Dxo viewpoint 3 – professional wide angle lens correction software and creativity in one package

 

For Dutch click here.

DxO Labs has released a new update of their wide angle lens correction software: Viewpoint 3.
New to this release is the added automatic horizon and distortion correction.
The existing manual distortion correction tools are now complemented by an all-auto option to correct geometric distortion while automatically cropping the image. A new miniature look is also added, providing a tilt-shift effect that can be adjusted by the user. You can adjust the direction of the blur gradients, make them symmetrical or not and even modify the look of the bokeh.

The existing perspective correction tools have been dramatically enhanced with an innovative, fully automatic mode that can instantly correct geometric distortion, straighten both horizontal and vertical lines, and automatically crop images, effectively eliminating keystoning while preserving the maximum information in the picture.

I’ve been able to test this new release.
Viewpoint 2 was on my computer for a short period of time, but I switched back to correcting everything in Photoshop again. But I have to be honest. After using Viewpoint 3 for a while, I won’t switch back to manual corrections in Photoshop soon. I really like the way the software helps you applying these corrections the easy way.

 

Perspective and distortion corrected in Viewpoint 3.

 

 

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It’s possible to use Viewpoint 3 in multiple ways. As a plugin to your favourite post processing software or as a stand-alone program.

When you export a photo to Viewpoit 3, it will automatically read the exif data and wil load the correct lens correction profile based on the camera model and used lens.

This works a bit different than you when you do this in Lightroom.
Inside Lightroom the lens correction profiles will also correct for vignetting (you can turn this off later). I personally prefer not to correct the vignetting, as most of the time the vignetting at f2.8 is something I like. I only want to correct the distortion. In Viewpoint 3 this is exactly how I would like it.
It’s also possible to decrease the amount of correction via a slider.

The fisheye correction is also very good.
Although nog all lenses are supported yet (as with my Samyang 2.8/12mm fisheye).
All lines are straightened pretty good and the distortion is corrected. Some bending is still present in the vertical lines, but this is easily corrected.

 

[av_heading heading=’Perspective correction’ tag=’h2′ style=’blockquote modern-quote’ size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ padding=’10’ color=” custom_font=”][/av_heading]

One of the most important features for architecture and cityscape photographers is perspective corrections.
Verticals should be completely vertical throughout the entire frame.

Viewpoint 3 excels in perspective corrections.
The automatic correction is perfect in a lot of situations, but with more sophisticated views the manual tools are your friend. It’s possible to auto correct both horizontals and verticals or either of them separately.
There are 4 manual tools to choose from:

  • force vertical parallel
  • force horizontal parallel
  • rectangle
  • 8 points

The force vertical correction tool works best with the photo below.
This will take the selected horizontals and verticals into account and will straighten the image.
Tip: when putting the + marks of the guides on the places where you want them, press shift to slow down the cursor so you have greater precision.

 

 

Something that I found when comparing the resulting images of Viewpoint 3 and Lightroom (guided upright tool) is that the images that came from Lightroom still had some distortion and the sharpness was slightly less in the area where the image was corrected the most. It’s only a bit, but it’s there.

 

dxo_vs_lightroom

Left DxO viewpoint 3 – Right Lightroom. See the slight distortion in the top of the building and a bit reduced sharpness.

 

 

The square correction tool is also perfect to correct the image which are taken with an angle.
This was something that I didn’t expect the software would do so good.

 

With the 8 point correction too you can use 2 horizontal and 2 vertical guides to correct the image.

To show you how well the software handles this, have a look at the image below.
Normally you wouldn’t do something like this, but it’s just to see what the software is capable off. I sure didn’t expect this.

 

 

 

When you didn’t line up the guides perfectly, it’s possible to further fine tune the image.
Just below the correction tools you will find different sliders to make the image perfect. You can also change the ratio of the image. So you have maximum flexibility with a super easy interface.

Tip: Enable the grid view, to see if all the lines are perfect.

 

dxo_viewpoint3_8-point-correction

Fine tune the correction with the sliders.

 

After this you can automatically crop the image or set a custom crop.
In the lower right corner you can see the actual or cropped dimensions of the photo.

 

[av_heading heading=’Horizon correction’ tag=’h2′ style=’blockquote modern-quote’ size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ padding=’10’ color=” custom_font=”][/av_heading]

From the DxO Viewpoint 3 press release: “The new auto horizon correction tool is equally efficient at correcting skewed landscape and architectural images. A single click detects the most relevant straight lines in the image, which are analyzed to determine the correct horizon.”

 

I can be quite short about this feature. It works.

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One of the disadvantages of wide angle lenses and group portraits is the deformation at the edges of the frame.
DxO Viewpoint 3 is now able to correct this, as you can see in the image below.
So you won’t have to hold back with your wide angle lens while taking photo’s of a group.

 

 

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One of the new additions in this release of Viewpoint 3 is a new tool that perfectly simulates the depth-of-field reduction that’s identical to the type of creative looks that is only possible with tilt shift lenses. To replicate the miniature look, DxO ViewPoint 3 displays the location and intensity of two blur gradients which the user can adjust symmetrically or asymmetrically. The software also gives us precise control on the type of bokeh.

 

dxo_viewpoint3_miniature-effect

Have full control over the miniature effect.

 

Use the tilt shift blur symmetrical or asymmetrical and change the position of the blur.

Miniature effect DxO viewpoint 3

Miniature effect DxO viewpoint 3

 

[av_heading heading=’Creativity’ tag=’h2′ style=’blockquote modern-quote’ size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ padding=’10’ color=” custom_font=”][/av_heading]

Combine all tools and create unique images.
It’s possible to get really creative with the miniature effect combined with perspective corrections.

Credit: DxO website

Credit: DxO website

[av_heading heading=’Conclusion’ tag=’h2′ style=’blockquote modern-quote’ size=” subheading_active=” subheading_size=’15’ padding=’10’ color=” custom_font=”][/av_heading]

For me DxO Viewpoint 3 is a welcome addition to my workflow.
Applying the automatic correction tools for both lens correction and perspective works great. And if the image is too complex, the easy to use interface and the high precision will help you to correct the perspective of your images.
The new miniature effect is fun to work with and give the ability to get creative.
It’s definitely a must have for photographers who use wide angle lenses.

Pros:

  • ease of use
  • good interface
  • automatic corrections
  • creative possibilities
  • quick results
  • fine tuning of corrections

Cons:

  • not all lenses are supported yet.

 

More information can be found on the website of DxO .

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